Psychoanalitic Criticism: The Use of Force by William Carlos Williams

The Use of Force

When it comes to literature, there are many critical theories we can use to gain an understanding of the texts we read. It also depends on what perspective we would like to glean that understanding. Applying Psychoanalytic Criticism to a text is one way of understanding the psyche of the author and the psychology behind the text’s meaning and the text’s purpose. Psychoanalytic criticism “argues that literary texts, like dreams, express the secret unconscious desires and anxieties of the author” (Delahoyde). This is where the Id, Ego, and Superego come in. Freud’s model of the psyche consists of the id which is the “instinctive, unconscious part of the personality” (McLeod). The id is Continue reading “Psychoanalitic Criticism: The Use of Force by William Carlos Williams”

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Mimic the Masters

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We’re often told that to be a better writer we should read. We should read, read, and read some more. We’re also told we should write every day. I’ve recently read several articles explaining how to find the time to write–for even a mere thirty minutes per day. As a student of online education, I read and write nearly every day. However, that is for academics. Does that matter? I don’t think it does. I think any type of reading or writing is beneficial in some way. I’m reading and paying attention to what experienced writers recommend to amateur writers like myself. Are they the masters? What do you consider a master in the craft of writing? I suppose anyone who has been writing for years and has several big works published could be regarded as a master at their profession. Or, is any writer who inspires you and gets your attention considered a master? Continue reading “Mimic the Masters”