Psychoanalitic Criticism: The Use of Force by William Carlos Williams

The Use of Force

When it comes to literature, there are many critical theories we can use to gain an understanding of the texts we read. It also depends on what perspective we would like to glean that understanding. Applying Psychoanalytic Criticism to a text is one way of understanding the psyche of the author and the psychology behind the text’s meaning and the text’s purpose. Psychoanalytic criticism “argues that literary texts, like dreams, express the secret unconscious desires and anxieties of the author” (Delahoyde). This is where the Id, Ego, and Superego come in. Freud’s model of the psyche consists of the id which is the “instinctive, unconscious part of the personality” (McLeod). The id is Continue reading “Psychoanalitic Criticism: The Use of Force by William Carlos Williams”

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Looking into the society of “Sons and Lovers”; a novel by D. H. Lawrence

Have you ever wondered why a novelist wrote a specific book? I often do. Sometimes it is good to delve deep into the historical events that support the time period of which a piece was written. Well, I did a little diving and this is my take on the novel Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence.

           As the world gave way to industrialism in the early twentieth century, there was a falling away from religion in British society. The pursuit of a secular or materialistic mindset and lifestyle soon gave way to a sense of false hope and desperation. Social issues such as “the income gap, poor working conditions, the collapse of Christian morals, and environmental pollution” played a significant part in the attitudes of the public (Wu). D. H. Lawrence spends a great deal of effort trying to expose the destructive influence that industrialization had on “human relations” and their “spiritual well-being” (Wu). We especially see this in Why the Novel Matters when Lawrence says “Men get ideas into their heads, of what they mean by Life, and they proceed to cut life out to pattern. Sometimes they go into the desert to seek God, sometimes they go into the desert to seek cash, sometimes it is wine, woman, and song, and again it is water, political reform, and votes” (Lawrence, Why the Novel Matters).

In the novel Sons and Lovers, Lawrence tells a story that reflects the deterioration of the family unit brought on by industry—coal mining to be exact. It starts out with a young woman, Gertrude, who becomes enamored by a young coal miner named Walter. The two marry and have four children. Life is not as easy as Gertrude had thought it would be and the family struggles to survive as Walter spends the majority of his time underground in the mines and the pubs drinking. This shows the deterioration of the spirit—the seeking of things other than God. The greed of industry threatens the well-being of the people who feed it—the workers. Continue reading “Looking into the society of “Sons and Lovers”; a novel by D. H. Lawrence”

Mimic the Masters

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We’re often told that to be a better writer we should read. We should read, read, and read some more. We’re also told we should write every day. I’ve recently read several articles explaining how to find the time to write–for even a mere thirty minutes per day. As a student of online education, I read and write nearly every day. However, that is for academics. Does that matter? I don’t think it does. I think any type of reading or writing is beneficial in some way. I’m reading and paying attention to what experienced writers recommend to amateur writers like myself. Are they the masters? What do you consider a master in the craft of writing? I suppose anyone who has been writing for years and has several big works published could be regarded as a master at their profession. Or, is any writer who inspires you and gets your attention considered a master? Continue reading “Mimic the Masters”