Giving and Receiving

gifts

Since the Holiday Season is upon us, I thought I’d contemplate on what it means to me. I’ve always preferred to give than to receive. However, receiving is an awesome feeling to me only when it is unexpected; a complete surprise. But, then, I feel sort of guilty for receiving. I know I shouldn’t feel that way. It is everyone’s God-given right to give. If I have the right to give than so does everyone else.

So, then in contemplating the act of receiving, I realized that I am also giving. I am giving another human being a chance to do something unselfish (or at least I hope it is a selfless act). The act of giving compliments the act of receiving and vice versa.

I remember one year when I was a young girl, my siblings, parents and myself were all sitting in our living room handing out presents and unwrapping them. Well, everyone else was unwrapping gifts, but I was just watching them. I never even gave a glance at the pile of gifts sitting before me to unwrap until my Mom said: “Jill, you have presents to unwrap too!” I was so startled by the fact that I forgot I had my own pile of beautiful gifts. I was happier watching everyone else’s happiness and excitement. To this day I am more excited watching everyone else as they unwrap their surprises.

Now that I am much older I enjoy the ambiance of our home and family gatherings as much as the giving of gifts. In fact, the gathering of family in and of itself is a gift. A gift that I enjoy more than ever.

To all of you who enjoy the act of giving please remember to enjoy the act of receiving.

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Psychoanalitic Criticism: The Use of Force by William Carlos Williams

The Use of Force

When it comes to literature, there are many critical theories we can use to gain an understanding of the texts we read. It also depends on what perspective we would like to glean that understanding. Applying Psychoanalytic Criticism to a text is one way of understanding the psyche of the author and the psychology behind the text’s meaning and the text’s purpose. Psychoanalytic criticism “argues that literary texts, like dreams, express the secret unconscious desires and anxieties of the author” (Delahoyde). This is where the Id, Ego, and Superego come in. Freud’s model of the psyche consists of the id which is the “instinctive, unconscious part of the personality” (McLeod). The id is Continue reading “Psychoanalitic Criticism: The Use of Force by William Carlos Williams”

Special Note

Special Note: Due to a major hurricane that hit Florida this September and the fact that I am still attending online college courses that take up a great portion of my time I haven’t posted according to schedule. Though I do try to keep a schedule, I know it is mostly “miss” than “hit.” I apologize for this. There is nothing worse than checking a blog that has been dormant for too long. I have a subject in mind for my next piece and will have it posted soon–hopefully within the next day or two. Please bear with me.

Things you never knew or simply never noticed.

tackle-1313972  marching band

Have you ever pondered the past and wondered how you never knew that someone was interested in you? This happened to me very recently, and I can’t figure out how I never knew. Was it that I never noticed or that he wasn’t very clear about his intentions?

I’ll fill you in just a bit here. I am one of those people who keep in touch with about a third of my high school classmates on FaceBook. I keep in touch, somewhat sparingly, with some and much more often with others. So, without naming names, I’ll tell you that the little chat box popped up with a “free hug” meme from a guy I graduated with. This guy was someone I always liked in high school but never thought any more about our relationship passed the friendship stage. He was a football player. I was just a girl. Nothing special–just a girl who didn’t really fit into any specific group of kids. Continue reading “Things you never knew or simply never noticed.”

Looking into the society of “Sons and Lovers”; a novel by D. H. Lawrence

Have you ever wondered why a novelist wrote a specific book? I often do. Sometimes it is good to delve deep into the historical events that support the time period of which a piece was written. Well, I did a little diving and this is my take on the novel Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence.

           As the world gave way to industrialism in the early twentieth century, there was a falling away from religion in British society. The pursuit of a secular or materialistic mindset and lifestyle soon gave way to a sense of false hope and desperation. Social issues such as “the income gap, poor working conditions, the collapse of Christian morals, and environmental pollution” played a significant part in the attitudes of the public (Wu). D. H. Lawrence spends a great deal of effort trying to expose the destructive influence that industrialization had on “human relations” and their “spiritual well-being” (Wu). We especially see this in Why the Novel Matters when Lawrence says “Men get ideas into their heads, of what they mean by Life, and they proceed to cut life out to pattern. Sometimes they go into the desert to seek God, sometimes they go into the desert to seek cash, sometimes it is wine, woman, and song, and again it is water, political reform, and votes” (Lawrence, Why the Novel Matters).

In the novel Sons and Lovers, Lawrence tells a story that reflects the deterioration of the family unit brought on by industry—coal mining to be exact. It starts out with a young woman, Gertrude, who becomes enamored by a young coal miner named Walter. The two marry and have four children. Life is not as easy as Gertrude had thought it would be and the family struggles to survive as Walter spends the majority of his time underground in the mines and the pubs drinking. This shows the deterioration of the spirit—the seeking of things other than God. The greed of industry threatens the well-being of the people who feed it—the workers. Continue reading “Looking into the society of “Sons and Lovers”; a novel by D. H. Lawrence”